Children in Crisis - Community Based Education Centres (CBECs)

Children in Crisis' Community Based Education Centres (CBECs) provide an intensive, accelerated primary school education for 300 out-of-school children (OOSC) in some of the poorest districts of Kabul.
2012Afghanistan

CEI Plus Status

Program Results Status
Monitoring and Evaluation Reporting

Location Data

KabulUrban

Millions of children in Afghanistan have never attended school and, though enrollment has dramatically increased in recent years, many children are now too old to be assimilated into public primary schools. Children in Crisis operates five Community Based Education Centres (CBECs) in some of the poorest districts of Kabul where public schools are scarce. Children in Crisis works closely with local leaders in each district, responding to the needs of the community and raising awareness of the importance of education, particularly for women. Each center serves the community through various opportunities:

  • Accelerated learning classes are the cornerstone of the CBECs. They serve more than 300 out-of-school children, predominantly girls, between the ages of 8 and 14. Students complete all 6 years of the nation's primary school curriculum in only 3 years and, through an agreement with Afghanistan's Ministry of Education, can be integrated into secondary public schools following completion of the program. 
     
  • Homework support classes work with children enrolled in public primary schools who are struggling with their coursework. Allotted instruction time in government schools is often insufficient and, for many children who do not receive adequate help at home, homework classes provide much needed support in specific subject areas.
     
  • Literacy and vocational classes for local women offer educational opportunities previously unavailable in these communities. Women in literacy classes follow the national curriculum and are eligible for certificates from the Ministry of Education. Vocational classes cover topics in demand by the community, such as tailoring. More recently, self-help group saving schemes teach women finance skills to help them manage their families' expenses or small businesses.  

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