Improving Quality through The Active Learning Method (ALM)

The Active Learning Method (ALM) involves learners doing something and then reflecting on what it is that they have done. It seeks to improve learners’ critical thinking, problem solving and comprehension skills.
2011Rwanda

CEI Plus Status

Program Results Status
Monitoring and Evaluation Reporting

Location Data

Five districts in Northern, Eastern and Western Province.

 

This program was piloted with support from the Innovation for Education Fund, a partnership between the Governments of Rwanda and the UK, managed by Cambridge Education

 

This project piloted the innovative ‘Active Learning Method’ of teaching – which could improve the quality of education in Rwandan basic education. The Active Learning Method (ALM) involves learners doing something and then reflecting on what it is that they have done. It seeks to improve learners’ critical thinking, problem solving and comprehension skills. The project involved training in-service teachers and pre-service teacher trainers to use more active learning methods in the classroom. Teachers engage in an ongoing ‘ALM cycle’ of monitoring, sharing and improving. During the ‘monitoring’ stage, teachers are being filmed in their own classroom and observed by other education staff using ALM classroom observation schedules. At the ‘sharing’ stage, reflection and discussion takes place based on the videos and classroom observations, and the strong points and areas for further development are discussed. At the ‘improvement’ stage, Teachers (in-service) and Tutors at Teacher Training Colleges (TTCs) (pre-service) then identify for themselves which areas they will work on to strengthen their capacity, with support provided by the project.

The pilot was implemented in 16 schools and 3 TTCs across five districts in Northern, Eastern and Western Province. Training was provided for 48 primary teachers, 12 TTC tutors and 6 Sector Education Officers (SEOs). The number of students reached was 7,835 in primary and 1,724 in secondary. 

While the ‘Active learning method’ has been implemented in classrooms in Ethiopia and Uganda, the specific methodology used, which put the learner at the centre of their learning process, is new to the Rwandan context. A baseline done in 2011 shows that teachers are trained in child centred approaches but lack the skills to apply this. Currently, most trainings given to change the teaching practises are restricted to the level of teachers in schools.

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