Keeping Girls at School (KGAS)

A multi-pronged approach, including school-based mentoring, girls’ clubs, saving and loan activities with associated training in financial management, and community score cards to provides support for girls in lower secondary school to stay in school and continue to upper secondary school.
2013Rwanda

CEI Plus Status

Program Results Status
Monitoring and Evaluation Reporting
Student supportCARE InternationalCambridge Education [Fund Manager]Girls' EducationLower secondary

 

This program was piloted with support from the Innovation for Education Fund, a partnership between the Governments of Rwanda and the UK, managed by Cambridge Education

 

The main aim of this project was to provide support for girls in lower secondary school to stay in school and continue to upper secondary school. A multi-pronged approach was developed to address the multiple challenges faced by girls that impact their attendance, retention and achievement in secondary school. This approach incorporated (1) school-based mentoring, (2) the establishment of girls’ clubs, (3) saving and loan activities with associated training in financial management, and (4) a community score card allowing girls to participate in decision making. The project was implemented in 30 schools in three districts of Southern Province and a total of 239 teachers and 6,178 girls were involved in KGAS activities.

1,617 individual girls were supported with one-on-one sessions by mentors during the project’s life (which represented 107.8% of the project target). 3,433 girls participated in saving and loans activities, exceeding the initial the target of 2,500 girls. The pilot achieved cumulative savings between January 2014 and March 2015 of 10,859,445 RFW (GBP 10,816) with an average saving of 3,165 RFW (GBP 3.1) per girl. In addition, those cumulative savings generated 1,323,615 RFW (GBP 1,318) of retained earnings (returns on savings) which represented 12.1% of savings. 231 girls’ clubs in the 30 pilot schools evaluated school services using the School Score Card and voiced their needs and rights. Girls selected the domains of scoring, developed indicators, met with schools authorities to evaluate the quality, accessibility and availability of services and developed action plans to address the issues raised.

The project represents a new way of working in inclusive education by bringing together the distinct activities of saving and loans, score cards, girls’ clubs and mentoring as a holistic approach for addressing girls’ diverse challenges.The challenge is keeping girls at school.

Who we work with: