Thanda After-School

Thanda's After-School Program aims to develop motivated, life-long learners with the confidence, knowledge and skills to improve both their own lives and their communities.
2008South Africa

CEI Plus Status

Program Results Status
Monitoring and Evaluation Reporting

Location Data

KwaZulu-NatalUmtwalumeRural

While after-school educational and enrichment programmes are widespread, curriculum, pedagogy and quality of delivery are often poor or inconsistent. Thanda's After-school Programme aims to develop motivated, life-long learners with the confidence, knowledge and skills to improve both their own lives and their communities. The program serves over 580 children in Grades R-11 at six schools in a rural community of KwaZulu-Natal - a community which faces myriad problems including high rates of HIV/AIDS, poverty, food insecurity, malnutrition, and unemployment. The programme's model uses existing resources cost-effectively: sessions take place in empty classrooms at local schools, and members from the community are hired and trained to become Educational Facilitators. Facilitator training places heavy emphasis on child psychology, history and global issues, while creating space for facilitators to go through the same learning processes they aim to spark in children – delving deeply into stories, history, and art in order to ask critical questions about the world. 

Thanda's After-school Programme applies an innovative approach to engaging both children in the learning process. Lessons are developed around available resources, rather than waiting for packaged solutions, and can be easily adapted to different age groups. Creativity and skills are prized above knowledge and right answers, and children are encouraged to have fun and take risks. Most curriculum units use a central artifact – such as a story, news article or work of art – to tackle a number of different learning areas. Racism, xenophobia and homophobia are discussed in sensitive and age-appropriate ways, using stories from other countries and communities as entry points that allow children to explore these issues in their own lives.
 

Who we work with: