Low-Cost Private Schools

Program Spotlight

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Who?

Low-income families in India with a monthly income of less than $300 lack skills and time to make sure their children acquire the basic skills for learning but send their children to English medium private schools that they can afford.

Why?

4 in 10 children in developing countries fail to learn the basics after 4 years in school (UNESCO, 2012). There are multiple, interconnected reasons for this:

 * children are first generation learners or first generation English learners

Background on Low-Cost Private Schools

Over the past decade, the number of low-cost private schools in low- and middle-income countries has steadily increased. This growth has been especially pronounced in certain geographies. In India, for example, the number of low cost private schools has more than doubled since 1993, while in Kenya, low cost private school enrollment has tripled since 1997, despite the abolition of public school fees. Parental buy-in has been central to the growth of low cost private schools. Commonly cited reasons for sending children to low cost private schools include overcrowding and high teacher absenteeism in public schools, a lack of public schools in some remote areas, a perceived high quality of teaching in private schools, and the presence of government incentive programs that cover private school costs.

The Center for Education Innovations (CEI) has documented 40 programs that focus on the low cost private school sector in its database of education innovations. These range from chains of schools that standardize their models to keep costs down to programs that provide support services to make schools more sustainable and affordable for underserved communities. Of these 40 profiled programs, 31 were launched after 2005 and most are located in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia (especially Kenya and India).

 

Database At-A-Glance

Click below to read our Database-at-a-Glance report and find highlights from six common approaches & characteristics across ECD models. Learn about programs focusing on:

1) Targeting underserved or marginalized populations with subsidies to improve access to education
2) Enhancing schools’ financial sustainability through revenue- generating strategies and access to affordable capital
3) Strengthening schools’ management capacity with business and operational support
4) Lowering the cost of services through standardized, replicable processes and technologies
5) Providing supplemental customized offerings to improve the quality of teaching and learning
6) Regulating and measuring the standards of low-cost private school providers


Low-cost private schools (LCPSs) in low- and middle-income countries have been garnering increasingly large amounts of attention in the global education sector. Here you can explore the universe of low-cost private schools operating in low- and middle-income countries.

Low-Cost Private Schools Programs in the CEI Database

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